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Grow Your Blog Community

With Wix Blog, you’re not only sharing your voice with the world, you can also grow an active online community. That’s why the Wix blog comes with a built-in members area - so that readers can easily sign easily up to become members of your blog.



What can members do?

Members can follow each other, write and reply to comments and receive blog notifications. Each member gets their own personal profile page that they can customize.


Tip:

You can make any member of your blog a writer so they can write posts for your blog. Adding multiple writers is a great way to grow your content and keep it fresh and diversified.




Here’s how to do it:

  1. Head to your Member’s Page

  2. Search for the member you want to make a writer

  3. Click on the member’s profile

  4. Click the 3 dot icon ( ⠇) on the Follow button

  5. Select Set as Writer

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© 2016 by Nicola.Williams 121. Proudly created with Wix.com

Attachment theory concerns the propensity to form strong emotional bonds with particular individuals, or with regard to children, their main caregiver. This is an innate characteristic present in infancy and continuing throughout adolescence, adulthood and into old age (Bowlby, 1973, 1982). The attachment system is activated in adversity or when an individual is distressed or ill, when there is the urge to seek comfort and support from the primary attachment figure or caregiver. However when the individual feels secure and not distressed there is the urge to explore the environment, to play, work and travel.

A secure home base is seen to be crucial for optimal functioning and mental health; however for some individuals this home base may have been the reason for distress.

Loss of an attachment figure or loved one is traumatic and tragic; this loss can be even more complex when it activates unresolved painful memories of earlier relational trauma and loss. The process of grieving and bereavement can be long and painful; the process can include such feelings as:

  • Denial: of the experience of loss.

  • Anger: wanting something to change.

  • Bargaining: an attempt to change this situation to avoid the pain of acceptance.

  • Despair: a painful experience, entering into a place where depression can accompany the working through and morning of a loss.

  • Acceptance: where the energy that was tied up in this stuck grieving is finally freed up for use elsewhere.

Therapy offers a space where you can begin to mourn and come to terms with your loss. Perinatal group support and therapy offers a space to explore intergenerational patterns of coping, and gain support in caring for your infant with a knowledge of your own past and why you may have felt depressed, anxious or alone.